A cross between a survey and a plea for help.

You may remember the long-gestating kitchen re-do.

The only thing holding the project back has been the matter of the countertop. I had long leaned in the direction of butcher block, even though I was worried about its various* drawbacks. A big part of why I did could be explained by the fact the butcher block color is ideal for the (postmodern Mediterranean, if that makes any damned sense) kitchen as planned.

Well! Something's come up. (Stay with me, because you're in this.)

Limestone.

The color works, it won't scorch and I think the price** is more or less right up my congenitally cheapskate alley.

(Here's where you come in.)

So...aye or nay on the limestone? (Anything that is not an "aye" will be considered a vote for butcher block. This is not a pure democracy, this is a representative republic.) Feel free to voice your opinion, or someone else's with a notarized statement, in the combox. You have until, say, Friday.

As you were.

-J.

* Believe it or else, the bacterial contamination thing isn't as big a deal as originally feared.
** Though not as ridiculously cheap as butcher block. Even super-duper fancy-pants butcher block -- finger-joined hardrock maple from John Boos & Co. -- is only 25%-33% the price of limestone.

Comments

Poppy Buxom said…
Reason number 4,267 why I don't have marble or butcher block countertops:

The bag of frozen blueberries that was inexplicably left on the counter long enough to thaw and leave a large puddle of dark blue juice. With freshly-sealed, almost-black granite, this was no problem.

How stain-proof is limestone?
Joke said…
If you seal it, very.

(Same with butcher block, which defeats its purpose, but it can be sanded down.)

-J.
Poppy Buxom said…
But it doesn't seem particularly cheap.
Joke said…
WHOA.

That is wa-a-a-a-a-ay more than our contractor quoted us. (+/- $80/sq. ft.)

-J.
daysgoby said…
butcher block. The limestone is sexy, but who wants to be bleaching wine stains?
Badger said…
Limestone? That stuff that's underneath my lawn that we have to literally blast through if we want to do anything fancier than plant a tree (trees just require jackhammers)? Are you HIGH?

It doesn't seem at all practical if you plan to actually COOK in your kitchen, as opposed to just parading people through it to ooh and aah over your sexy countertops. I can't believe you could ever seal it well enough to stop it from soaking up moisture, particularly living in Humidity Central like you do, at which point it will crumble into bits.

Er, all of which is to say that I vote NO on limestone.
blackbird said…
I cannot imagine how you would live with either. If pressed, for YOU, I'd choose the butcher block. Limestone is so crazy to take care of that, over this way, they don't sell it anymore. (I don't buy that sealing story - it's light and it's permeable. Balsamic vinegar anyone?)
AND it's way expensive (here, anyway).
In YOUR kitchen I'd consider concrete counters. Or honed stone.
olivespearls said…
I vote for butcher block.
HEATHER said…
If you want to go with stone, why not just go with granite?
MsCellania said…
I have SEALED limestone backsplashes in the lower level kitchen and also around the popcorn bar. That kitchen is only used for rinsing stuff.
Supposedly.
There are stains aplenty on both backsplashes - on the kitchen backsplash from rinsing beer/whisky/kiddy drink glasses or art stuff, and on the popcorn backsplash from the coconut oil that we use in the popcorn machine (mostly from paper towels left lurking on the counter and brushing up against the backsplash). We don't use that kitchen that much, but use the popcorn machine a few times a week.
We are going to use limestone again in our kitchen remodel, but there will be a solid-surface backsplash behind the cooktop, the coffee center and the entire sink area for easy cleanup.
I've had concrete, tile, butcher block, granite slab, granite tile, stainless steel, corian and formica. Slab granite is the hardiest and easiest to clean by far. I gave up on the 'sealed' butcher block and just sanded it every few months (with 00 and 000 sandpaper) and then lathered on the mineral oil, buffing it out between applications. Never again. I'm getting too old for that kind of servitude to a surface.
crafty said…
Well, I was all for the limestone until I read the comments.

Now, I have no idea.
LIMESTONE!?????!!! Are you OUT OF YOUR FREAKIN' MIND???????


DUDE.
ONE WORD
AND YES I'M YELLING
I CAN'T EVEN TYPE THIS FAST ENOUGH

POROUS.

POROUS.

Don't believe that sealant SHIT - it's FREAKIN' LIMESTONE.

Oh yes, it is very very pretty.
BUT IT's LIMESTONE.

It is not the friend of the kitchen. And certainly NOT the friend of a diehard home cook.

RUN RUN RUN very far away from limestone. RUNNNNNNNNN.

Ok.
Taking a deep breath.

One word for you:
Ceasarstone.
http://www.caesarstone.com.au/
gallery/kitchens.html


No Limestone.

Did I mention that?
teachergirl said…
I think the previous post pretty much said it all. But what is the rest of the kitchen going to look like? I just don't see butcherblock in your part of paradise. It seems so dark and paradise is so...light.
louise said…
Hmm can't imagine limestone..but can imagine sanding back butcher's block...repeatedly. How about marble..you can use it for making pastry on.
Something has been niggling in my brain about a countertop I saw and loved but could not remember the name of for days. And then I read this
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/10/
garden/10counters.html?ref=style and remembered - soapstone! It is gorgeous and very suited to kitchen use. I saw it on This Old House YONKS ago. Just lovely.
BreadBox said…
Have to say --- limestone --- and spilled vinegar --- suggest volcanic eruptions....
We've been very happy with our uba tuba granite which we put in a few years back.

N.

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