Cherry

Yeah, yeah. I know. Mea maxima culpa. Here's what you would/should have seen a while back.

-J.
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One of the latest things which has taken the world by storm, or at least my corner of it, is taking the decidedly fanatically, dysfunctionally obsessive Joke-like approach to food and extrapolating it into the cocktail sphere.

The first guilty party to go up against the wall, in matters of food or beverage, is The Artificial Ingredient. So, in pondering the ideal Manhattan cocktail, I was stymied by the fact the cocktail cherry is a concentrated repository of multisyllabic chemical evil. Of late, there have been some places where cherries not aswim in an ocean of something-hyde and something else-zoate are available, but at prices which betray their purveyors' wide-eyed innocence regarding prices during The Great Recession.

This leaves me no alternative but to pursue the DIY approach, as I am simply not going to pony up $22.99 for a mere 8oz. Especially when I know the ingredients contained therein add up to a princely $2 at very most.

Before you start to bemoan the the effort required to make your own cocktail cherries know this – setting aside the time required for cooling -- a batch takes but a mere 10 minutes.

There are, of course, aeleventy gazillion different cocktail cherry recipes, but a good starter cherry recipe is this one:
6 pounds dark, sweet cherries
¾ cup sugar
1 cup water
¼ cup fresh, strained lemon juice
2 cinnamon sticks
1 ¼ cups cherry brandy or liqueur. For this go-around we have Cherry Heering, but the next time it'll be Kirchwasser. (You can use brandy, bourbon, pisco, rum, rye, grappa, vodka...etc.)

Put sugar, water, and cinnamon in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium-low. Add the lemon juice and cherries. Simmer 5 minutes. Remove from burner, fish out the cinnamon sticks, and stir in the liqueur/liquor.

The smart thing to do is to pit the cherries, but I chose to keep the pits for a more complex flavor...and because I couldn't be bothered in my zeal. Next time, I will enlist someone I have offsprung to man the pitter. I also chose basic supermarket sweet (NOT SOUR) cherries.
These cherries are amazing!
You will need to make extra, because you will ingest half of them warm right from the stove. These will definitely migrate into your supply of vanilla ice cream and banana splits will suddenly begin to materialize. The ensuing cherry liqueur is also spectacular. Mind you, bereft of chemical escort, the cherries will eventually "turn" at +/-2 weeks, and they hit their peak of excellentness at the 1 week mark.

Try it, I exhort you!

-J.

Comments

blackbird said…
silent so long and now with the exhorting!

sounds good though...
Katy said…
Would they last longer if you were to actually "can" or really, jar them like jam or other sorts of preserves? I haven't actually done any canning myself, but these seem like a good candidate.
Joke said…
Katy,

I THINK so.

-J.

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